Tag Archives: Lung Cancer

Emotional Illness

Let’s get one thing straight: emotions do not cause disease. The fault of your physical illness very likely lies with something other than you. The whole notion that anything from kidney stones to cancer could be traced back to an emotional block, repressed anger, wrongs un-righted, or any other random psychological hurt from this life or a past one, is so corrupt that it should never be given credence by any rational being. Yet throngs of people with well-intentioned sounding titles like “life coach” or “healer” spread these malicious little bits of victim blaming as if they were offering salvation in a bottle of snake oil.

That said, I want it to be clear that not everyone who identifies as a healer is guilty of either victim blaming or willfully misleading those who they are trying to help. I’ve known incredibly sincere, warm, compassionate people who do their absolute best to improve the health and well-being of others through a wide swath of tools and approaches, arguably with strong results. And, frankly, many people need some form of guidance in their lives and have relied successfully on many such “coaches” to get where they need to be. I’m not condemning whole industries or forms of practice or even job titles here; this isn’t about valid occupations, but rather about those who choose to exploit the fears and insecurities of patients under the guise of offering miraculous cures through attitude adjustment. Continue reading Emotional Illness

The Rash Is Back

Spoiler alert: my rash has returned.

Before I get into the details of this new leg of my journey, I’m taking a moment to reflect on the side-effects of the past. In August of last year (2017), I stopped taking chemotherapy due to signs of progression. After about a month of cleaning out my system, I noticed a serious boost in both my mental and physical energy levels. My body began shaping up. I felt really good. And I started my first “targeted” therapy, the drug Gilotrif (generic name, afatinib).

Gilotrif was highly promising at the time. It had shown some level of effectiveness on the HER2 mutation in cancer studies but was still off-label for my use because it was designed to target a very closely related mutation. I loved it at first, however, because I kept feeling better and — in comparison to my 2 years and 8 months on Alimta (generic name, pemetrexed) — there was just an amazing lack of initial side-effects. Alimta had been fairly easy to tolerate overall and I had no real complaints considering how well it had worked. But I did have some skin and digestive issues, as well as persistent fatigue, that plagued me every month. Toward the end, the skin issues were particularly bothersome, and I was beyond thrilled when they cleared up. Continue reading The Rash Is Back

Recent Posts and Updates

Because I am sometimes spread more thinly than others across the social media spectrum, I need to add in one of these aggregate posts to link over to articles you might have missed because they were not posted here on my blog. In order to maximize my ability to target other patients and caregivers, I have published quite a lot on LungCancer.net while reserving the space here on my blog for more personal or passionate material.

While I hope that my readers are keeping up with the wider range of my work and social comments either by following my author page on Facebook or reading my Twitter feed, it is still easy to miss new material in these over-saturated times.

So, without further ado, here are links to some of my recent material you might have missed. Don’t forget to option-click so that these links open in a new tab, making it easier to come back to this page for more clickety-clicking fun! Continue reading Recent Posts and Updates

Another New Beginning

Well, it’s time for another needle. I’d been successfully avoiding a lot of these for the past six-ish months, but the afatinib pill I had been taking simply wasn’t working the way we needed it to. (Which is to say, it did not stop the cancer from spreading, much less reduce its presence.) So, on this uncharacteristically rainy Southern California day, I commuted through a maze of side streets to avoid morning rush hour traffic on my way downtown to the university hospital where I am to receive today’s infusion. It’s a far cry from the cozy satellite clinic I had been accustomed to up in Pasadena. I’ve spent the better part of 90 minutes waiting for things to be prepared since I checked in; I’ve wandered the maze of the hospital, searching out a paltry offering of snacks in the lower-level cafeteria and the free coffee in the main waiting room, sitting in various rooms and surfing the free Wi-Fi (but unable to stream Flint Town on Netflix, much to my chagrin).
 
Here, in the Day Hospital, as it is called, the vibe is wholly different than the spa-like atmosphere of my old chemo haunt. While this is certainly clean and bright, it feels like a hospital. There is nothing aesthetically pleasing about the large room cordoned off by sliding curtains. A few windows along one wall allow a tiny amount of natural light in, but they may be closed off by curtains at any time. Yet the reception staff seems bright and friendly.
 
The drug I am getting today — ado-trastuzumab emtansine, or Kadcyla — is not a traditional chemotherapy, and there have been some weird holdups in getting it properly scheduled. In part, this is because my use will be slightly off-label. My insurance company refused to approve it — but they also would not deny it, leaving me in a strange limbo where other plans were difficult to make. The hospital pharmacy has been working with the drug manufacturer to cover the costs in case insurance ultimately denied coverage, and we are moving forward with the understanding that, somehow, the medication will get paid for. These concoctions are so expensive that it is unreasonable to expect that patients could actually afford to pay out of pocket, but somehow the system works to cover these costs most of the time. The trick is figuring out how. I am three weeks delayed getting in for this new treatment, which hopefully will be drastically more effective than the pill I had been taking. At least the bar there isn’t very high.

Continue reading Another New Beginning

Radiation and Me, A Love Story

It all started with a pain in my back. I was a mess. Every day, the pain grew and spread until it ran down my entire left leg and shot up into my chest. What I had hoped might be a simple pinched nerve turned out to be the result of a new metastasis in the muscle of my lower back, conveniently pressing gently up against the sciatic nerve like a feather made of barbed wire attached to a cattle prod.

To treat this nasty beast, the only practical solution was to zap it with radiation — something that I could barely wait to begin doing. By the time this was presented as an option, I was in such agony that surgery would have been appealing. Radiation, by comparison to virtually anything else, sounded like a relief. Continue reading Radiation and Me, A Love Story

Support Where It Is Due

As a lung cancer patient, I certainly receive a fair amount of emotional support. Maybe some of it is more well-intentioned than helpful, maybe sometimes I don’t get what I really need, but I know it is there and I am ever-grateful for it. But as a patient, it is easy to find support in many ways, through friends and family, through community, through blogs and online forums and in-person support groups. Patients are obvious recipients of support, people who clearly need it for what we are going through. But there is another class of individual who carries an equal or higher burden and is consistently overlooked in the need for support: the caregiver. Continue reading Support Where It Is Due

Walk (or Run) for Cancer Research

The idea of creating or participating in events that raise awareness about lung cancer is very close to my heart. My mother started the Breathe Free Walk to support lung cancer research, and I was in South Carolina for its inaugural event in 2016. The turnout was amazing considering the lack of resources or experience in putting it together, and the 2017 walk was an even more successful fundraiser.

Part of raising awareness is giving voice to other patients and listening to other points of view. There are many types of lung cancer, and the patient experience can be wildly different. It is important to understand that many of our preconceived notions about these cancers paint a picture that often does not reflect the reality of these experiences.

One thing I have found very enlightening is in my exposure to patients with mesothelioma. This variety of lung cancer has long been associated with older patients who worked around asbestos, a material that has long been known to cause cancer. So discovering patients who contract this disease under the age of 50 conflicts with expectation. And yet, it is much more common than I had ever imagined.

Below is a guest post, contributed by a mesothelioma patient who shares my view about the importance of group events designed for both fundraising and awareness.


Charity Runs Help Raise Money, Awareness for Cancer

Guest author: Virgil Anderson, from mesothelioma.net

Charity runs and walks serve several purposes: they raise awareness and money for non-profit causes, bring communities together, and also promote fitness and wellness in those communities. From the smallest neighborhood runs to national organizations, charity runs for cancer are important for bringing awareness and raising funds for research and patient care. This is especially important for rare cancers, like mesothelioma, that get less attention and less funding. Here are some of the bigger runs, and a small run that is just as important.

Runners raising awareness for cancer research
A Cancer Awareness Fundraising Run, Photo: Virgil Anderson
The STOP CANCER Run/Walk

STOP CANCER is an important charity group because it focuses on raising money to help fund young researchers, those that are the most promising and who are working on innovative new treatments and preventions for all types of cancer. The annual run and walk takes place in October and raises hundreds of thousands of dollars every year and attract over 1,000 runners and walkers. It takes place in Van Nuys, California, with participants coming from all over the country to run, walk, and donate.

Relay for Life

One of the biggest cancer events in the country is the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. It is a nationwide team event with the purpose of raising funds for cancer research, patient care, and cancer education and prevention. What makes this event different from other fun runs and walks is that, depending on the particular event it lasts between 6 and 24 hours. Each team participating has someone on the course at all times, as a symbol that cancer never stops or sleeps. Thousands of events are coordinated for Relay for Life in communities across the U.S. and in other countries.

Race for the Cure

Another of the biggest cancer charity runs in the country is the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Like the Relay for Life, this is a nationwide event with individual races occurring in many communities. And unlike that event it is an example of a charity run organized for a specific type of cancer. The Race for the Cure raises money for research, screening, treatments, and education for breast cancer. The races have contributed $2 billion to these efforts over the years.

Miles for Meso

Another important, but smaller running event is Miles for Meso, which highlights the rare asbestos-related cancer known as mesothelioma. It is organized by the Simmons Mesothelioma Foundation and is a 5K run or walk that raises money but also crucially raises awareness, a constant issue for rare diseases. The race began in Illinois but now is held in several locations in multiple states every year in the month of September. Money raised goes to the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, which has eradicating mesothelioma as its main goal.

Fun runs and walks are not the most efficient way to raise money for a worthy cause, but there are many important reasons they are valuable. Building awareness is one of the most crucial of these reasons, especially for diseases that are not so common. They are also important for community building and getting people involved beyond simply writing a check to make a donation. And finally, these events are positive experiences for everyone, bringing people together for a good cause and to get people active and socializing. These events are to help cancer patients, but they are so much more than that.


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New Scans, New Consultations, New Opportunities

If you are anxious to get an update on my Gilotrif / afatinib treatment, you can listen to me talk about it for approximately ten minutes on my podcast, but this is a fairly busy day for me and I’ve got something far more interesting started… It isn’t every day that a person is asked to participate in a research project that could have direct ramifications for the future of cancer care across the board, much less my family or my own body.

Research Matters

Because I get my treatment through a major research institution, of which my oncologist is a key player, I’m fortunate to be considered for (or at least kept up to date on) new trials and the latest in treatment options. But today, as my session with my oncologist was concluding, he brought in a representative of a research project to ask if I was willing to participate in their study. The immediate benefit for me is that I will get a complete genomic sequencing done on my tumor. That is pretty impressive.

Sharing Data Matters

The ORIEN Total Cancer Care Protocol requires relatively low patient commitment — they have access to my existing tissue samples, which hopefully will afford enough material for them to work with, and in less than five minutes I was in and out of a quick blood draw. Now I get to sit back and see if they find anything interesting. ORIEN stands for The Oncology Research Information Exchange Network. It is all about data sharing and matching patients to precision medicine for treatment. Of course, there is no knowing whether it will turn up anything new or unique for me to try in the near future. I am looking at this more as an opportunity to be a part of something greater, that will positively affect future generations.

The research part of this study, technically under the umbrella of clinical trials, is very ambitious. It isn’t expected to reach completion until after 2036, however; I’m hoping that I’ll be around to read about their conclusions.

 

 



If this post resonates with you, please consider supporting my work through a monthly subscription to my feed on Patreon, or a one-time donation through PayPal. Follow me on TwitterFacebook, Tumbler and many other fancy social sites or apps. Please share my posts to groups you are involved with on Reddit or Google+ or anywhere else that you feel it will help or enlighten or inspire another reader. (Sharing buttons are below the post!)

Thank you!

Advocacy, Messaging, and Outreach

As a “Lung Cancer Advocate,” writing for multiple sites is a way to reach and presumably help more people. That is why I sometimes take a break from my blog and contribute to discussion sites like Quora or write for communities like LungCancer.net. I participate on sites like Patients Like Me, Health Unlocked, and Cancer Support Community. I also publish my audio and video blog, The Deep Breath, for subscribers on Patreon (there is a link for the RSS feed for the audio-only episodes). All in, it sometimes seems like I am spread a little thin.

But it is important to reach out in many ways, especially, it seems, when Lung Cancer Awareness Month still seems neglected in the wake of the Breast Cancer Awareness Month juggernaut that is Pink Ribbons and merchandising and organized events at every turn. Not to mention that there are more causes seeking awareness than there are months, and the limited color options for ribbons are often appropriated for multiple causes (sometimes even simultaneously).  Continue reading Advocacy, Messaging, and Outreach

Looking Fine Vs Feeling Fine, the Deception of Image

Coping With the Pressure of Looking Fine

Feeling Relatively Fine

Obviously, a certain theme has been on my mind recently. It is one, no doubt, that I will continue to explore.


If this post resonates with you, please consider supporting my work through a monthly subscription to my feed on Patreon, or a one-time donation through PayPal. Follow me on TwitterFacebook, Tumbler and many other fancy social sites or apps. Please share my posts to groups you are involved with on Reddit or Google+ or anywhere else that you feel it will help or enlighten or inspire another reader. (Sharing buttons are below the post!)

Thank you!